How to Stay Healthy during Covid19

As of this writing, almost 9 million confirmed cases of Corona Virus Disease worldwide are recorded. Sadly, there’s currently no vaccine available.

Is it possible to stay healthy during Covid-19 pandemic?

yes!

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the best way to prevent contracting it is to avoid being exposed to the virus.

It is frightening indeed but don’t fret just follow these – 5 simple steps that summed up everything you need to know:

1. Social Distancing

– also called “physical distancing,” means keeping space between yourself and other people outside of your home.

To practice social or physical distancing stay at least 6 feet (about 2 arms’ length) from other people.

socialdistancing-cdc_490x350

2. Wear Mask

– this is one of the best tools to protect yourself or other people from Corona Virus.

A campaign called “Wearing is Caring” – now circulating across the globe to promote the importance and responsibility of wearing mask and other safety measures to halt or minimize the virus spread.

In a study of 94 patients from China, they found that patient with Covid-19 released the most virus at initial onset or before symptoms become apparent. And that a great proportion of transmission occurred before the first symptom appeared. Hence, wearing of face mask is being required by many local government & establishments across the globe.

3. Practice Frequent Handwashing

– during Covid-19 pandemic, keeping hands clean is especially important to help prevent the virus from spreading. It is recommended to wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

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What’s the best Time to Wash Your Hands?

  • Before, during, and after preparing food

  • Before eating food

  • Before and after putting or removing your mask

  • Before and after caring for someone at home who is sick with vomiting or diarrhea

  • Before and after treating a cut or wound

  • After using the toilet

  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet

  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing

  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste

  • After handling pet food or pet treats

  • After touching garbage

 

4. Stay Home

The whole purpose of quarantine is for people to stay home and refrain from non-essential travel. There are exceptions though like essential workers, buying groceries and medicines and those who need medical care. When going out make sure to remember steps 1-3 and carry with you a bottle alcohol or sanitizer that contains at least 60% of alcohol.

5. Improve Your Immune System

– Our Body’s Immune System is our first line of defense against any illness.

Our immune system is an intricate network of cells, tissues, and organs that band together to defend your body against foreign invaders – things like germs, viruses and bacteria.

There’s such a thing as “Viral Load”, also known as viral burden, viral titre or viral titer, is a numerical expression of the quantity of virus carried by an infected person. This medical term is emphasized given that thousandths of frontliners succumbed to Covid-19 and many died from it.

These frontliners are exposed to higher amounts of Corona Virus everyday. Making themselves more vulnerable on getting infected.

woman in yellow protective suit wearing white face mask
Photo by CDC

Here enters the importance of having a strong immune system. Supplements like Vitamin C, antioxidants and zinc work wonders with our immune system and help it function effectively. Enough rest and at least 7 hours of sleep is equally significant in strengthening our bodies.

With frontliners getting ill, sleep deprivation is another probable cause.

“Evidence supports the need to sleep for seven to eight hours each night and suggests that those who regularly sleep less than this are at higher risk of serious health problems such as heart disease, diabetes and stroke.”

Covid-19 is fatal, and a strong immunity can guarantee a recovery. Half of the persons infected don’t develop symptoms (asymptomatic) while most patients have only mild symptoms.

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As we continue our collective battle against this dreaded Covid-19, it is important to establish a routine and shift to health-promoting behaviors.

Let us remember the simple Five Steps listed above. 

Stay home if possible and Stay Safe.

Thanks for reading.

Lose weight at home

Here are proven tips for losing weight using reliable methods that really work:

  1. Get good sleep! A lack of sleep (less than seven to nine hours nightly for most people) can mean a lack of weight loss.
  2. Eat more fiber: Adults need to aim for at least 25–30 grams daily from things like veggies, fruit, ancient grains, sprouted legumes and seeds.
  3. Use healthy fats: Coconut oil has natural fat-burning effects just like GC does, plus many more benefits like improving gut health, too. Other healthy fats that can help control your appetite include real olive oil, avocado, fats from grass-fed beef, nuts and seeds.
  4. Utilize adaptogen herbs: Adaptogen herbs like maca, ginseng and rhodiola can help control health conditions that can make it hard to lose weight (like high amounts of stress, thyroid issues, leaky gut, adrenal fatigue, cellular toxicity and candida).
  5. Don’t skimp on protein: Protein foods are satisfying and essential for building muscles. Regularly include proteins like cage-free eggs and wild-caught fish in your meals.
  6. Consume probiotics: Probiotic foods and supplements not only help balance improve digestive health, but they also balance hormones, raise immunity, control your appetite and play a part in weight control.
  7. Switch up your exercise routine: Try burst-training exercises and other forms of high intensity interval training (HIIT) to keep challenging your muscles, work in with a group, add in weight training, and relax with yoga in between workouts.
  8. Stand up more during the day: Sitting for long periods of time is associated with being overweight and a higher risk for obesity.
  9. Sneak more fitness into your day: Take the stairs, do body weight exercises at home. or try wearing a fitness tracker for motivation — try some of these exercise hacks.
  10. Schedule your workouts ahead of time: This makes it much more likely you’ll follow through.
  11. Use essential oils for weight loss: Natural oils including grapefruit, cinnamon and ginger oil can help control your appetite, hormones and digestive symptoms.

Article: Dr.Axe

Having Endometriosis & Adenomyosis; avoiding hysterectomy by lifestyle/diet change

A post shared by Shehaswhat (@shehaswhat) on

This is the continuation of post what to do when you have both endometriosis & adenomyosis. 

If you are like me, sadly, having both endometriosis and adenomyosis – we have natural alternatives to deal with these conditions. No need to suffer in silence, I know entirely how you feel and the infallible agony you are going through, for I’m experiencing it too!

I sympathised with my endo-sisters in their 20’s or 30’s who had hysterectomy as their last resort. That’s what most doctors would recommend to end patient’s complain about pain.

But is it the only cure?

If there’s anything we can do to avoid the ousting of our wombs or ovaries, we would definitely jump on it right? Most especially when we’re still trying to conceive. We are often confronted with varying dilemmas of whether to have it removed or not, take synthetic hormones to mask the symptoms and pain, and the endless misconception that the pain we are feeling is “normal” for women during their menstruation. 

In Endometriosis Diet: Foods to Eat and Foods to Avoid, there are certain lifestyle choices that play a big role in the progression of endometriosis or adenomyosis. Foods can greatly influence the hormones, particularly estrogen balance, and can negatively affect us with these conditions. 

Both diseases are caused by what else – hormonal imbalance, usually an excessive of estrogen supply. The management for endometriosis and endometriosis is the conventional palliative therapy with pain medications and hormonal manipulation. Minor surgeries and the final course is hysterectomy. 

“Various published studies have shown that 12% of patients with Adenomyosis also have been diagnosed with Endometriosis in other sites outside the uterus, within the pelvis. As high as 62% of women who had hysterectomy were found to have this disease on pathology reports.” – alternativesurgery.com

Endo-diet for me seems unthinkable & impractical (pardon the candidness). Of course I want to be healthy but being able to eat only what is suggested ugh! is a punishment. And so I thought of improvising, tweaking it a little bit. I call it my hormone-helper nutrition. Long name alright, it is basically a diet of having mostly plant-based whole foods and some selected supplements. 

I still indulge on eating seafood, pork, free-range chicken but not red meat. I now avoid red meat, alcohol, artificial sweetener and other inflammatories. I also began reducing my calorie intake and monitor my calorie consumption. There’s a lot actually, but baby steps is crucial and really important.

So what is plant-based whole foods? 

Plant-based examples; almond milk, coconut sugar, whole grains, cereal, nuts, legumes, fruits – food that didn’t undergo processing. Organic and free from chemical or GMO’s. The supplements I’m taking are posted in herbal supplements. We may have different reactions and in Filipino saying “hiyang” when certain herb improves our situation. So I suggest to do baby steps, take supplements one at a time and monitor any response. 

Wellness practices – Lifestyle change

Exercise – when we sweat, our body releases endorphins. These are chemicals to help you become less sensitive to pain. It also triggers a positive feeling in the body, naming it “happy hormones”. Do you know that I went back to the gym and started doing dumbbell workouts, and I feel so good after workout. 

R and R (rest and relaxation) – living in constant pain can cause more stress. Making symptoms worse and you more anxious and sensitive to pain. So chill out, relax and practice deep breathing exercises. 

fitness girl hands lifestyle
Photo by Pexels.com

Acupuncture – this I have yet to try. It is a traditional Chinese therapy that uses fine needles to stimulate points in your body. It increases blood flow and releases natural pain-killing chemicals thus help us in pain during flare-ups. 

Counting Calories – which helps a lot in weight management. Using a mobile app to assist you, I have the free version of – Lose it! and thinking of upgrading to premium because of a continued effort to improve my condition.

lose-it-app

 

These are some points to consider or to try, paying tribute to my endo-community. I recently underwent some endometrial procedures, my doctor removed two benign polyps from my uterus (thank God) and so far I’m pain free! 

Having both endometriosis and adenomyosis should not dictate your life. It led however to a drastic awakening on my part, but I got up and continue to get up in spite the pain. Seek help and there’s always hope – #endohope.

 

 

 

Resources:

Home

https://www.webmd.com/depression/guide/exercise-depression#1

https://www.thecut.com/swellness/2016/07/can-diet-and-nutrition-help-with-endometriosis.html

Read more:

My Endometriosis Story: Journey through Pain

endometriosis story: procedures 

endometriosis is different from period pains

herbal supplements for Endometriosis

endometriosis story: journey through pain 2

dealing with Diastolic Dysfunction

Diastolic Dysfunction as simplified in previous post – Explaining Diastolic dysfunction in simple terms, is a heart condition when diastole part is not functioning properly. 

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Before treatment, it must be accurately diagnosed since it has similar symptoms as Systolic Heart Failure. 

Treatment – first means a change of lifestyle & medicine (some doctors call it Cardiac Rehab), or an invasive option which is surgery to replace a damaged heart valve. And the following managements should be prescribed and supervised by your cardiologist.

  • strict control of hypertension

  • aggressive treatment of coronary artery disease

  • use of diuretics to control pulmonary congestion

  • use of vasodilators to make blood vessels open up, increasing in the size of the blood vessels allows more blood to flow through. This lowers the blood pressure and lessens the workload of the heart

  • use of beta blocker or calcium channel blocker to relax the heart muscle

  • or an ACE inhibitor to relax blood vessels and lower blood pressure. Helps the heart to pump more blood out to the body.

  • strict water and salt restriction to prevent congestion

  • weight control

How to take care of a family with Diastolic Dysfunction?

  • let them rest, shorten their working hours if possible

  • help reduce stress – anxiety and anger can increase heart rate and blood pressure. A relaxing and calm environment will help promote a stable heart rate and blood pressure

  • monitor their blood pressure and heart rate regularly

  • help them limit their salt intake

  • remind/give them their medicines on time

  • assist them to manage their weight and watch out for sudden weight gain that may be a sign of congestion

 

God bless your heart,
mitch.e

 

Medical References & Further Readings:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21861070

Diastolic Dysfunction

https://www.summitmedicalgroup.com/library/adult_health/car_diastolic_dysfunction/

https://academic.oup.com/bjaed/article/9/1/29/465857

 

 

Explaining Diastolic dysfunction in simple terms

This post will try to explain the condition called Diastolic Dysfunction in layman’s term.

First, we have to know the two parts to the pumping action of the heart. You can use the photo below as reference.

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1. Diastole – first part, when blood collects in the lower heart chambers (left & right ventricles)

2. Systole – second part happens once the ventricles contract and blood is pushed from the right ventricle to the pulmonary artery and from the left ventricle into the aortic valves.

Diastolic Dysfunction refers to when diastole part is not functioning properly. The heart stiffens and ventricles do not relax so they cannot fill with blood and causes blood to “dam up” in other parts of the body.

Pressure in the ventricles then increases as blood from the next heartbeat tries to enter. This leads to extra pressure and fluid building up in the vessels of the lungs (referred to as pulmonary congestion) or in the vessels that lead back to the heart (referred to as systemic congestion).

Pulmonary congestion – causes fluid to leak from these vessels into the lung alveoli, causing pulmonary edema. This condition clogs oxygenation of blood in the lungs, resulting in shortness of breath and in worst case scenario even death if the condition is not discovered and treated actively.

The systemic congestion – has detrimental effects on other organs in the body such as the kidney and liver, as a result of poor organ perfusion. Swelling and congestion may also occur in the legs and within the abdomen.

Causes and Symptoms:

The major causes of Diastolic Dysfunction –

  • Obesity and unhealthy lifestyle

  • High blood pressure

  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (the walls of the heart become thick and stiff)

  • Aortic stenosis (narrowing in one of the heart valves)

  • Coronary artery disease

  • Restrictive cardiomyopathy (scars or deposits that make the heart muscle stiff)

  • Aging

Symptoms can be from nothing to shortness of breath or labored breathing, unusual swelling of the legs/feet, and fast or irregular heart beat.

If you manifest the above symptoms and a family history of heart disease, consult a trusted Cardiologist and the following tests will help diagnose if you have Diastolic Dysfunction.

  • Chest X-ray

  • Echocardiogram (ECG)

  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

 

God bless your heart,

mitch.e

 

Medical references and for Further reading:

https://www.summitmedicalgroup.com/library/adult_health/car_diastolic_dysfunction/

https://academic.oup.com/cardiovascres/article/45/4/813/299300

https://www.news-medical.net/health/Diastolic-Dysfunction-Causes.aspx

https://www.healio.com/cardiology/learn-the-heart/cardiology-review/topic-reviews/diastolic-dysfunction