Posted in health, health & fitness

7 things to do with migraine

Migraine is debilitating and most of the time frustrating. But here are some ways to lessen migraine occurrence and improve the quality of life among migraine sufferers. I know someone close to me who has been suffering from migraine since childhood and the first 5 really helped him.

What to do?

Although researchers haven’t been able to pinpoint exactly why migraines attack, they do understand the physiological changes that occur when a migraine strikes. When the nerve cells in the brain become overstimulated, they release chemicals that cause inflammation and swelling in the blood vessels in the neck and brain. The interventions listed below work by addressing these issues. Here are seven surprising natural cures for migraines that help prevent and reduce the frequency and severity of migraine attacks.

1. Exercise

Exercise has long been recommended to migraine sufferers, and now there’s new evidence to support the theory that physical activity appears to help prevent migraines. In a 2011 randomized, controlled study from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, researchers found that aerobic exercise was as effective at preventing migraines as the preventive migraine medication topiramate (brand name Topamax). A third of the patients in the three-month study exercised on a stationary bike three times per week for 40 minutes, while another third took a topiramate regimen that was gradually increased to the highest tolerable dose (a maximum of 200 milligrams per day).

The exercisers and drug group both experienced a similar reduced number of migraines, but 33 percent of topiramate users also experienced adverse side effects, while the exercisers reported none. The researchers concluded that regular exercise may be an option for migraine sufferers who don’t want to adhere to a daily medication regimen, and the medical community agrees that the findings are encouraging.

How it helps: Regular, gentle exercise helps to reduce tension and ward off stress, a well-known trigger for many migraine sufferers. Exercise also triggers the release of endorphins, which act as a mild sedative.

How much helps: The Department of Health and Human Services recommends 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity per week, ideally spread out over the course of the week. Beware that intense exercise can actually trigger rather than prevent migraine, so don’t overdo it.

2. Riboflavin (vitamin B2)

Riboflavin, also known as vitamin B2, is found in certain foods and supplements. It helps protect cells from oxidative damage and is involved in energy production. In a trial measuring the effectiveness of riboflavin in preventing migraines, 59 percent of patients who took 400 mg of riboflavin daily for three months experienced a 50 percent or greater reduction in migraine occurrence.

How it helps: Riboflavin is an effective preventive treatment for migraines. It has been widely reported to significantly reduce the incidence of migraine headaches when consumed at high levels (400 mg per day), although it doesn’t seem to help reduce the pain or length of a migraine once one occurs.

How much helps: The recommendation is 400 mg per day for three months. Researchers recommend taking riboflavin with a B-complex supplement, since riboflavin increases the absorption of other essential nutrients, including iron, zinc, folate, vitamin B3, and vitamin B12. In addition, vitamin B1 can help increase levels of riboflavin.

3. Magnesium

Because our bodies can’t make magnesium, we must rely on dietary and/or supplement sources to get it — and magnesium deficiency been directly linked to migraines in a number of major studies. Some estimates say that as many as three out of four adults in the U.S. may be deficient in magnesium.

How it helps: Magnesium helps relax nerves and muscles and transmits nerve impulses throughout the body and brain. In addition, magnesium helps prevent nerves from becoming overexcited. In short, this mineral aids in the prevention and reduction of migraines.

How much helps: Experts are split on how much magnesium to take for migraine prevention; some recommend 200 to 600 mg per day, while others recommend as much as 1,000 mg daily. Talk to your doctor to find a regimen that works best for you. If you take magnesium supplements, use chelated forms (such as magnesium citrate or magnesium oxide). This means that the magnesium is connected with another molecule in order to aid its absorption.

4. fish oil/Omega 3

There are some small-scale studies that show the ingestion of fish oil can help reduce migraines and head pain, thanks to its omega-3 fatty acids, which promotes heart health. The American Heart Association states that the ingredients in fish oil may help reduce inflammation, blood clotting, lower blood pressure, and steady heart rhythm. Those actions in turn may help reduce head pain because it may reduce the inflammation of blood cells that press and pinch on nerves.

 5. Avoid MSG

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is added to food to enhance its flavor. It is derived from an amino acid, called glutamic acid, which occurs naturally in various foods. Many people who suffer headaches find that foods containing MSG triggers migraines or other types of headaches, possibly due to the fact that it excites our neurons. Make sure you read food labels to check if the product has MSG, the FDA is requires companies to list it, however it can also be hidden as a component of other ingredients. Watch for some of these words, which can give away “hidden” MSG, and be extra cautious around Chinese food, processed meats, canned vegies, gravy/soup/dip mixes, and soy-based items.

6. Improve your posture

Improving your posture can make all the difference in the world when it comes to tension-type headaches. Many of us spend our days working in an office or sitting down at a computer with little to no movement, and many of us are guilty of poor posture. We slouch, slump, and hunch forward, which strains our muscles and creates nasty headaches. Try using an ergonomic chair if you’re sitting down a lot, and make a conscious effort to sit up tall but relaxed, with your shoulders back, your chest open, and your neck not sticking too far forward. Working on strengthening core muscles helps a lot with posture, since balance and the strength to support ourselves properly comes from mostly from our center.

7. Drink water

On average we don’t drink enough water daily, and that alone is cause for a headache. Coffee, alcohol, sugary drinks-all can dehydrate you (hence the pounding headache that comes along with a hangover) and should be avoided. As soon as your head starts to hurt, drink a tall glass of water, and then sip throughout the day. Gradually the pain will start to ease up, and you’ll be hurting less and well-hydrated to boot. Simply drinking water may seem too obvious or simple to actually work as a headache remedy but it can, and often time’s does. We humans often just seem to feel the need to make things more complicated than they are.

You use your head for a lot of things, maybe not all things, but hopefully for a lot of them, and a throbbing pain in your noggin can really make it hard to function. While over-the-counter pain killers may temporarily relieve the discomfort, they’re not going to prevent headaches from returning full force-or worse- in the future. Give some headache home remedies a shot, and you’ll end up saving yourself a headache (probably lots of headaches) in the future.

Best if you consult your doctor and have a total medical check up particularly MRI to find out if there’s an underlying cause behind your migraines.

Posted in corona virus, covid 19, health, life

Covid-19 Infographics

Sharing Infographics you may use for free.

No registration needed. From reputable sources like WHO World Health Organization and CDC Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Stay Safe!

untitled design-3

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covid symptoms

 

Posted in corona virus, health, life

The Most Common Covid-19 Symptoms

Know the symptoms of Covid-19 that range from mild to severe cases varying from one patient to another. This serves as a guide only and it is important to seek professional help if symptom worsens.

Top 3

1. Fever

2. Cough

3. Shortness of breath or Difficult Breathing

The next 6 are the new addition to common symptoms of Covid-19 or Novel Corona Virus Disease.

1. Chills or Shaking

2. Fatigue

3. Sore throat

4. Muscle Pain

5. Headache

6. Loss of taste and smell

These may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with mild symptoms should self-isolate immediately to avoid further spread of the virus.

Serious Symptoms

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

  • Chest Pain or pressure

  • Loss of speech of movement

Above list does not include all possible symptoms.

covid symptoms

Thanks for reading.

Stay Safe!

Posted in covid 19, health

Anti-Covid Masks, everything you need to know

Wearing Face Mask has become a global trend. Its importance is being backed by professionals in the fight against Covid-19. Came across an update from South Korea with their own Kf94 mask. They made their own in response to the high demand and shortage of mask. But first, let us review the different masks in the market.

WHO – World Health Organization strongly advise the use of mask as protection against Corona Virus as it can be transmitted via close contact droplets between people. It is almost similar with airborne transmission but this virus should not be taken lightly. As of this writing, there are 3,428,422 confirmed cases and 243,831 deaths worldwide. Bringing even the most powerful countries to its knees.

 

 

Surgical/Medical Mask

Surgical masks are disposable, loose fitting masks that cover your nose, mouth and chin. Filters as much as 60-80% of small particles under lab condition. It is often flat and rectangular in shape with pleats or folds. Since it is for one time use only, a lot of people are using this now and throw on rivers and other bodies of water.

 

Homemade Cloth Mask

Affordable and reusable, anyone can make at home. Though it offers little protection especially if it has no filter inserts, it’s better than not wearing anything. The risk lies from providing a false sense of security. User of Cloth Mask should remember that it doesn’t replace other protective measures like frequent handwashing and social distancing.

 

N95

This kind of mask is more tight fitting and has oval or circular design. Can filter out 95% of very small particles like viruses and bacterias. Some types have exhalation valves which can help in breathing and humidity. Please make sure there are no gaps between your skin and edge of the mask so no particles can enter. 

photo of person wearing face mask

 

kN95

kN95 is designed in China. kN95 and N95 are almost identical on the features important in Covid-19 protection. Both masks capture 95% of tiny particles about 0.3 micron to be exact. Again, reminders on finding a good fit and comfy enough for you.

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Pitta Mask

US has N95, China has kN95, while Japan has Pitta Mask. It is sleek and incredibly popular with celebrities wearing one with matching OTDs. Claims to filter PM 2.5 or smaller particles of matter. It is made of sponge-like material. Elastic, light and comfortable to wear. 

pitta mask

 

PM2.5

As the name suggest, PM2.5 mask filters PM 2.5 or smaller particles just like Pitta Mask. PM stands for Pollutants in Micrometers. PM 2.5 is equivalent to 0.001 millimeters. Highly comfortable too, shape is similar to kN95.

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kF94

Pardon if I’m biased to this. Not because I’m a K-pop fan but I’ve grown accustomed to wearing one. South Korea solved their mask shortage by creating their own. kF94 stands for Korea Filter. This is their protection level and filters 94% of particles. It has quadruple filters and has ergonomic 3D design that allows breathing space for nose and mouth. 

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Sponge Mask

A dupe for Pitta mask, it is breathable and comfortable. Great for those allergic to synthetic fibers of Surgical/medical mask (like me) since it’s skin-friendly. Washable and reusable, too! A good alternative to cloth or surgical masks.

shopee_9b1d995021bf8dbd65d0222ed91271886498428234992058394.jpg

 

Antibacterial Face Masks

One particular brand – BioMask – is a revolutionary face mask that inactivates 99.99% of viruses/bacteria with the surface of the mask. BioMask has a hydrophilic plastic coating that rapidly absorbs aerosol droplets away from the outer surface of the mask. The first and second layers of the mask are treated with different compounds that inactivate viruses. Some types use Carbon for their antibacterial property. Taiwan made one under the brand – Blue Eagle. 

 

So there you go, summed up all masks in the market. Wear mask when going out. That’s because studies show that people can spread coronavirus even if they don’t have symptoms (called asymptomatic) or before they have symptoms (called presymptomatic).

Please do remember that wearing mask is just one way to protect yourself. It is equally important to practice social distancing and frequent handwashing. 

Stay Safe everyone!

 

Posted in health, natural medicine, women’s health

vitex on endometriosis

Vitex or chasteberry is a female friendly herb that’s been used for centuries. It is proven effective and in scientific studies, too.

Vitex is one of the most popular herbal remedies for PMS and cramps. In fact, one study published in the Journal of Women’s Health & Gender-Based Medicine found that after being treated with vitex for three menstrual cycles, 93 percent of patients reported a decrease in the number of PMS symptoms or a complete end of PMS complaints. (1)

As with every herbal I take, I make sure I read reviews, facts, history and testimonies if there’s any. To lessen mistakes, wastage and to save money. Plus, I’m doing the homework for you, saving you time on research & mobile data, you’re welcome 🙂

If you are like me who’s in 1 out ten. Taking tried and tested herbs could be beneficial for us. To lessen symptoms, alleviate pains and discomfort, and help in normalizing of our hormones. I’m currently into injectable type of hormones (luprolex) and thus gives me menopausal like symptoms, the more reason I should take vitex together with my other supplements including Organic Spirulina, Vitamin B-complex, non-acidic vitamin C and Evening Primrose Oil.

Please keep in mind that vitex is not a hormone, it’s a medicinal plant or fruit that reminds our bodies to produce the actual hormone – progesterone.

There are other herbal remedies available and are mentioned in my previous post https://mypanoplies.com/2018/05/31/herbal-supplements-for-endometriosis/

Posted in health, natural medicine, women’s health

What are food – inflammatories?

Food that can trigger an inflammation is considered an inflammatory. Women with endometriosis/ or adenomyosis should stay away from these inflammatories to lessen flare up & discomforts we experience regularly. 

Inflammation – is our body’s immune response, a natural response to protect itself from harm.

When our body is in continuous inflammation due to stress, bad habits & unhealthy eating, it becomes “chronic” manifesting into various symptoms such as; fatigue (loss of energy), digestive problems like diarrhea or constipation, skin issues, allergies, asthma, depression, anxiety, & high blood glucose levels.

With body in constant inflammation, our cells start attacking our body (auto-immune response). This results to many illnesses, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, heart diseases and cancer.

 

So what are these inflammatories that we should get rid from our diet?

  • refined carbohydrates

  • processed foods

  • fast food

  • saturated and trans fatty acids

  • GMO food

  • conventional dairy

  • alcohol & caffeine

  • sodas & other drinks with artificial sweeteners

 

food alcohol beer foam
Photo by Tookapic on Pexels.com

 

After that very painful attack recently, I’ve made a decision to really eliminate the inflammatories in my diet. In our international community we call it – endodiet. 

I thought I was going to die in severe pain, while vomiting everything I ate that day. Perhaps, this is life-changing for me, optimistic as always, dealing with endometriosis while helping fellow endo-sufferers by sharing my story, learnings and researches. 

 

Usual expression, but it is true – food is medicine

Since inflammation can have so many triggers and there are inevitable factors such as pollution, injury or sickness. We have the power to control and be mindful of what we eat/drink to stay healthy or pain-free. Join me for further studies on how to help and manage our unique condition.

Next post we will discuss the best anti-inflammatories. 

 

 

Read more:

Having Endometriosis & Adenomyosis; avoiding hysterectomy by lifestyle/diet change

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/foods-that-fight-inflammation

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/6-foods-that-cause-inflammation#section2

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/248423.php

 

 

Posted in natural medicine, women’s health

Having Endometriosis & Adenomyosis; avoiding hysterectomy by lifestyle/diet change

A post shared by Shehaswhat (@shehaswhat) on

This is the continuation of post what to do when you have both endometriosis & adenomyosis. 

If you are like me, sadly, having both endometriosis and adenomyosis – we have natural alternatives to deal with these conditions. No need to suffer in silence, I know entirely how you feel and the infallible agony you are going through, for I’m experiencing it too!

I sympathised with my endo-sisters in their 20’s or 30’s who had hysterectomy as their last resort. That’s what most doctors would recommend to end patient’s complain about pain.

But is it the only cure?

If there’s anything we can do to avoid the ousting of our wombs or ovaries, we would definitely jump on it right? Most especially when we’re still trying to conceive. We are often confronted with varying dilemmas of whether to have it removed or not, take synthetic hormones to mask the symptoms and pain, and the endless misconception that the pain we are feeling is “normal” for women during their menstruation. 

In Endometriosis Diet: Foods to Eat and Foods to Avoid, there are certain lifestyle choices that play a big role in the progression of endometriosis or adenomyosis. Foods can greatly influence the hormones, particularly estrogen balance, and can negatively affect us with these conditions. 

Both diseases are caused by what else – hormonal imbalance, usually an excessive of estrogen supply. The management for endometriosis and endometriosis is the conventional palliative therapy with pain medications and hormonal manipulation. Minor surgeries and the final course is hysterectomy. 

“Various published studies have shown that 12% of patients with Adenomyosis also have been diagnosed with Endometriosis in other sites outside the uterus, within the pelvis. As high as 62% of women who had hysterectomy were found to have this disease on pathology reports.” – alternativesurgery.com

Endo-diet for me seems unthinkable & impractical (pardon the candidness). Of course I want to be healthy but being able to eat only what is suggested ugh! is a punishment. And so I thought of improvising, tweaking it a little bit. I call it my hormone-helper nutrition. Long name alright, it is basically a diet of having mostly plant-based whole foods and some selected supplements. 

I still indulge on eating seafood, pork, free-range chicken but not red meat. I now avoid red meat, alcohol, artificial sweetener and other inflammatories. I also began reducing my calorie intake and monitor my calorie consumption. There’s a lot actually, but baby steps is crucial and really important.

So what is plant-based whole foods? 

Plant-based examples; almond milk, coconut sugar, whole grains, cereal, nuts, legumes, fruits – food that didn’t undergo processing. Organic and free from chemical or GMO’s. The supplements I’m taking are posted in herbal supplements. We may have different reactions and in Filipino saying “hiyang” when certain herb improves our situation. So I suggest to do baby steps, take supplements one at a time and monitor any response. 

Wellness practices – Lifestyle change

Exercise – when we sweat, our body releases endorphins. These are chemicals to help you become less sensitive to pain. It also triggers a positive feeling in the body, naming it “happy hormones”. Do you know that I went back to the gym and started doing dumbbell workouts, and I feel so good after workout. 

R and R (rest and relaxation) – living in constant pain can cause more stress. Making symptoms worse and you more anxious and sensitive to pain. So chill out, relax and practice deep breathing exercises. 

fitness girl hands lifestyle
Photo by Pexels.com

Acupuncture – this I have yet to try. It is a traditional Chinese therapy that uses fine needles to stimulate points in your body. It increases blood flow and releases natural pain-killing chemicals thus help us in pain during flare-ups. 

Counting Calories – which helps a lot in weight management. Using a mobile app to assist you, I have the free version of – Lose it! and thinking of upgrading to premium because of a continued effort to improve my condition.

lose-it-app

 

These are some points to consider or to try, paying tribute to my endo-community. I recently underwent some endometrial procedures, my doctor removed two benign polyps from my uterus (thank God) and so far I’m pain free! 

Having both endometriosis and adenomyosis should not dictate your life. It led however to a drastic awakening on my part, but I got up and continue to get up in spite the pain. Seek help and there’s always hope – #endohope.

 

 

 

Resources:

http://dietvsdisease.org

https://www.webmd.com/depression/guide/exercise-depression#1

https://www.thecut.com/swellness/2016/07/can-diet-and-nutrition-help-with-endometriosis.html

Read more:

My Endometriosis Story: Journey through Pain

endometriosis story: procedures 

endometriosis is different from period pains

herbal supplements for Endometriosis

endometriosis story: journey through pain 2

Posted in health, natural medicine, women’s health

what to do when you have both endometriosis & adenomyosis

Years with endometriosis made me scour the internet for answers, explanations, & remedies. Spoke with many experts including my friends; Doc April Fabian and Doc Mae Syki-Young. Sadly, endometriosis and adenomyosis are both understudied and misunderstood. But no time for self-pity, not me, and so I began a crusade against most women’s health issues. 

The thing with doctors is that they’re too busy to explain our illness. And so when I was made aware of these complications, it hit me hard – I’m not getting well. Instead of falling into despair, I decided to continue my advocacy, share my story so others can learn from it.

 

 

This post is to help my endo-sisters take care of themselves, save the rest of their reproductive organs in natural ways possible, manage painful symptoms, avoid further complications, when you’re like me – afflicted with endometriosis and adenomyosis.

So far, I had two surgeries since the time of diagnosis. First surgery when the doctor was proudly pre-occupied in using the latest technology, yet there was lack of sympathy and everything seemed fuzzy. I thought I had to seek another opinion. And so I did. 

 

“The hard part is that you can’t really do anything—you can’t fix it.”  

“You can treat heavy periods but you can’t get rid of adenomyosis without a hysterectomy. That’s why we don’t look for it [as doctors] because we can’t do anything about it.”

“People often think that with modern medicine, everything can be fixed. No, actually, a lot of things can’t be fixed but we can do a lot to minimize people’s symptoms,” explained Dr. Lisa Dabney (harpersbazaar.com)

I hope it’s not too late for me, my dear Nanay (grandma) would always remind and worry about me and I was like “I’ll be okay, this is nothing.” I’ve been always “matapang” which means brave in Filipino, in dealing with life’s hurdles. Until I discovered two years ago that I also have adenomyosis. So these two plus other adhesions are my arch nemeses. 

 

“The medical definition of endometriosis does not even begin to describe the reality of what it means to have endometriosis. The next time you hear about endometriosis, please remember how devastating this disease can be to a person. While endometriosis can be frustrating, if you have a loved one, friend or co-worker who suffers from endometriosis, please remember to treat them with respect and compassion.” – vitalhealth.com

Endometriosis was explained in previous posts. You can check them here —

Adenomyosis in brief is a condition when the tissue that normally lines the uterus grows into the muscular wall of the uterus. Similar to endometriosis with displaced endometrial tissues but the affected area is different. In adenomysis it is inside the wall of the uterus, as to endometriosis is outside the uterus and can be on other organs of the body like intestines, appendix and lungs (rare).

mc-adenomyosis-illo-1498161855
Difference between Adenomyosis and Endometriosis

Though there are no specific cures, you can positively help your condition with pain management, healthy lifestyle, good/proper nutrition and exercise. The food we ingest affects our bodies especially our hormones. The endocrine system like the rest of our body systems work in complex structure that begins from ingestion of nutrients. And so we shall start with food.

There’s a diet called endo-diet. In endo-diet there are suggested foods to avoid and to take. See below;

Foods to avoid

  • trans-fat – Recent research showed higher rates of endometriosis diagnosis among women who consume diet high in trans fat. Trans fat is found on fried, processed and fast foods. 

  • red meat – the consumption of red meat can increase risk to develop endometriosis as suggested by some research. 

  • gluten – there’s one study showed a decreased in pain by 75% after eliminating gluten in their diet.

  • FODMAP –  stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. These are all types of carbohydrates. When poorly absorbed, these can aggravate symptoms of IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) including bloating, constipation, flatulence, pain and nausea. It is best to read the labels and watch out for the following that has FODMAP in it; fructose, lactose, polyols like xylitol, maltitol & mannitol found mainly on artificial sweeteners.

  • alcohol & caffeine – these can promote inflammation and worsening of our condition.

Eat this not that FODMAP food list and shopping guide
dietvsdisease.com

Foods to eat (yay!)

  • fibrous foods such as fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains

  • iron-riched foods to replenish the blood loss in heavy bleeding or clotting. Examples are dark leafy greens, broccoli, beans, nuts and seeds

  • foods high in essential fatty acids such as salmon, tuna, mackerel, chia and flax seeds

  • anti-oxidant rich foods like oranges, cranberry, dark chocolate (yum!) and beets

Supplements as mentioned in this post – herbal supplements for Endometriosis were found to be also beneficial. Studies showed significant reduction in pain & other crippling symptoms using supplementation.  

 

#TMI

There’s just too much, ikr! but ladies don’t lose hope. We can do baby steps, and remember you’re not alone. 

Let’s continue on next post! Thanks for your time 🙂

 

Resources:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/adenomyosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20369138 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=low+fodmap+diet+and+endometriosis

https://www.vitalhealth.com/endo-blog/what-it-really-means-to-have-endometriosis/ 

https://www.healthline.com/health/endometriosis/endometriosis-diet#foods-to-avoid 

https://www.dietvsdisease.org/diy-low-fodmap-diet/

Posted in health, health & fitness

my endometriosis story: procedures

Envious of other countries where they have shown support, sympathy and awareness to those suffering in endometriosis. There’s even an organisation to help endo-sufferers raise fund, and begin valuable scientific research to find a cure for this “invisible” illness.

I would like to start a campaign here in my homeland, gather all my endo-sisters because I know we are stronger together – let us not suffer in silence!

I always believe that when we help others, we all rise up. And I want you to know that you are not alone…

A procedure called hysteroscopy was done to me two days ago. But before I jump into that, let us begin with the basics.

There are several endometrial procedures one has to undergo to diagnose and manage – endometriosis.

ENDO FACTS:

1. It takes an average of 10 years to accurately diagnose endometriosis.

2. One in Ten (1 in 10) women gets affected by it.

3. that’s about 176 million women in the world have endometriosis.

4. 68% of women with endometriosis were misdiagnosed with another condition.

Endometrial procedures:

*ultrasound – to diagnose this illness or other causes of pelvic pain. This test uses high frequency sound waves to create images of what’s inside the body. It cannot tell however if you have endometriosis but still helpful to see if you have cyst formations. This I need to have yearly or as advised by my Ob to monitor the cysts, scars or adhesions due to endometriosis.

*laparoscopy – this is an invasive procedure which was done to me more than 5 years ago. During this test, the doctor will make tiny incisions to insert the laparoscope – in my case 5 incisions, to see the endometrial implants, some may have to collect sample for biopsy and remove adhesions.

*SISH (saline infusion sonography) – is a type of ultrasound where a small volume of saline is inserted into the uterus, which then allows the lining of the uterus to be clearly seen on uterine scan.

*hysteroscopy – using a hysteroscope, similar to that of laparoscopy, the doctor inserts that to view into the cervix and inside the uterus. It can also remove polyp/s like in my case, and get samples for lab testing.

These procedures are very crucial in diagnosing and management of this condition. Please see your doctor to help and guide you in your endo-journey.

Hope this post helps, supporting fellow endo-sisters an once of pain at a time. See you again.

A post shared by Angela (@angelamiadee) on

related articles and resources:

endometriosis is different from period pains

My Endometriosis Story: Journey through Pain

herbal supplements for Endometriosis

My endometriosis story: Journey through pain 2

My Endometriosis Story: Post Op

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/endometriosis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20354661

https://www.webmd.com/women/guide/what-is-hysteroscopy#1

Posted in health, natural medicine, women’s health

endometriosis is different from period pains

she has what?

Saw this battle cry unanimous for all of us suffering from endometriosis.

Living with endometriosis means a lot of patience when dealing with scrutiny and misunderstanding from people. They’d ask me, what do you feel? And I often replied, “indescribable pain.”

 

 

So what is really the difference between a regular menstrual discomfort and endometriosis?

Read full post;

My Endometriosis Story: Journey through Pain

The female reproductive organs are shown with red patches of endometriosis located on the ovaries and on the outside of the uterus. The uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, vagina, and areas of endometriosis are labeled.
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF HEALTH, USA

In order to understand completely one’s affliction is to have one. Pondering through the imponderable – a condition that is widely misunderstood and how to live above “it.” The dilemmas we endo-sufferers usually encounter are finding the best and sympathetic doctors, accurate diagnosis that will not take years, and having the right treatment/managements. It all begins with understanding this condition.

 

Endometriosis is an ailment while menstrual pain is merely a symptom, an indication.

Menstrual cramps last about two days only while in Endometriosis, it can be everyday or intermittent. Cramps can be considered normal if it’s not disabling and severe.

It would be best to see your doctor if your menstruation starts to feel odd, irregular and or extremely painful. 

After chatting with an #endosister this morning who has yet again been overlooked and told her symptoms are just gastro related…I thought it was important to share this. Never stop fighting for answers and advocating for yourself. You know your body best.💪🏼💕 — I’ve always had severe GI symptoms associated with my Endo. How many of you initially presented with GI symptoms which lead to your diagnosis? Please comment and share your experiences below.👇🏼❤️ . . . Image via @dririsorbuch #endofact #endometriosis #theendoproject #endostory #myendostory #endometriosisawareness #adenomyosis #pelvicpain #chronicillness #invisibleillness #womenshealth #endosisters #endostrong #endocommunity #endowarrior

A post shared by The Endo Project (@theendoproject) on

I’m currently writing this post prior to an endometrial procedure. Yeah a bit worried, but I’m placing everything in God’s hands. The thing with endometriosis is that you can never be complacent, even in the absence of pain, one has to continuously see a doctor and a regular check-up/diagnostic test is crucial. There’s no other way to monitor our condition but through periodical ultrasound.

I always feel the need to reach out to my fellow 176 million endo-sisters worldwide through writing and sharing my journey. Hope is definitely a powerful driving force that renders us strength and courage especially in this trying times.

 

Women empower woman. Every day your stories and your courage inspire, support and empower others. At @theendoproject we share all of our community stories for this very reason. Story telling is powerful stuff and we are much stronger together. I’m so proud to be a part of this community and to be an #endosister ❤️ — We would love to know how far our #endocommunity reaches. Please comment below and tell us where you are in the world!👇🏼🌏 — If you would like share your #endostory please send an email to helloendoproject@gmail.com. 📝 . . . Image via @treatingendo #endometriosis #theendoproject #endostory #myendostory #endometriosisawareness #adenomyosis #pelvicpain #chronicillness #invisibleillness #womenshealth #endosisters #endostrong #endocommunity #endowarrior

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Tried some supplements to alleviate its symptoms and help my body counteract the side-effects of taking various pharmaceutically made hormones. Sharing in the post herbal supplements for Endometriosis.

This blog aims to help endo-sufferers find hope, ease symptoms, prevent avoidable complications and to spread awareness and understanding of their families and friends.

RELATED RESOURCES:

https://www.webmd.com/women/endometriosis/ss/slideshow-endometriosis-overview

http://endometriosis.org/resources/articles/facts-about-endometriosis/

https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/endometri/conditioninfo